A word elicitation study including the development of scales characterizing aided listening experience

  • Dorte Hammershøi Department of Electronic Systems, Signals and Information Processing, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
  • Anne Wolff Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and Audiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark
  • Lykke J. Andersen Master program in Engineering Psychology, E-Study Board, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • Rikke L. Mortensen Master program in Engineering Psychology, E-Study Board, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • Mads D. Nielsen Master program in Engineering Psychology, E-Study Board, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • Stefanie A. Larsen Master program in Engineering Psychology, E-Study Board, Aalborg University, Denmark
Keywords: hearing aids, word elicitation, scales, Affinity diagram

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to identify the terms hearing aid professionals and their patients use in the communication about the aided listening experience and develop scales that would help characterize this experience in the domain of corrective actions that a hearing care professional may apply. The study comprised a word elicitation task based on observations and interviews from consultations at the Aalborg University Hospital. The results were analyzed by developing an affinity diagram. The resulting 80 words were then sorted by three hearing professionals in a supervised card sorting session. The resulting attributes were included in a 63-point scale design, which (in a usability test including eight hearing-aid users) were considered easy to survey and use, but also including some redundancy and ambiguities. The results suggest that it is possible to develop scales based on the voluntary statements expressed during actual consultations, but it remains uncertain whether the expressions will be interpreted the same way by other patients and professionals.

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Published
2020-04-22
How to Cite
Hammershøi, D., Wolff, A., Andersen, L., Mortensen, R., Nielsen, M., & Larsen, S. (2020). A word elicitation study including the development of scales characterizing aided listening experience. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research, 7, 297-304. Retrieved from https://proceedings.isaar.eu/index.php/isaarproc/article/view/2019-34
Section
2019/4. Novel directions in hearing-instrument technology