Using BEAR data to obtain reduced versions of the SSQ-12 and IOI-HA-7 questionnaires

  • Tobias Piechowiak GN Store Nord A/S, DK-2750 Ballerup, Denmark
  • David Zapala Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA
Keywords: Factor analysis, EMA, SSQ, IOI-HA, Questionnaires, Machine learning

Abstract

The Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing scale (SSQ-12) and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA-7) are questionnaires containing 12 and 7 items, respectively. They are designed to subjectively assess hearing ability and are complementary to behavioral measures. Both questionnaires have been applied across a range of clinical and clinical research-related contexts, for example for assessing outcomes of e.g., cochlear implants and hearing aids. However, due to time constraints neither of the questionnaires seem to be an inherent part of standard clinical quality control. The Better Hearing Rehabilitation (BEAR) database contains SSQ- 12 and IOI-HA-7 scores of around 1600 subjects. Applying an Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) on the data from the 2nd visit allowed us to reduce the SSQ-12 to 5 questions and the IOI-HA to 3 remaining questions. The SSQ-5 explains 79% of the variance in the SSQ-12 data while the IOI-HA-3 accounts for 70% of the variance in the original IOI-HA-7. These new versions have the potential to be used more efficiently by shortening time and focusing on the items that are most effective to reflect individual benefit. Furthermore, the analysis seems to confirm the validity of such a reduction from similar findings in the literature that were done on different datasets.

Author Biography

David Zapala, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA

The Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing scale (SSQ-12) and the Inter-
national Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA-7) are questionnaires
containing 12 and 7 items, respectively. They are designed to subjectively
assess hearing ability and are complementary to behavioral measures. Both
questionnaires have been applied across a range of clinical and clinical
research-related contexts, for example for assessing outcomes of e.g. cochlear
implants and hearing aids. However, due to time constraints neither of the
questionnaires seem to be an inherent part of standard clinical quality control.
The Better Hearing Rehabilitation (BEAR) database contains SSQ-12 and
IOI-HA-7 scores of around 1600 subjects. Applying an Exploratory Factor
Analysis (EFA) on the data from the 2nd visit allowed us to reduce the SSQ-12
to 5 questions and the IOI-HA to 3 remaining questions. The SSQ-5 explains
79 % of the variance in the SSQ-12 data while the IOI-HA-3 accounts for
70 % of the variance in the original IOI-HA-7. These new versions have
the potential to be used more efficiently by shortening time and focusing on
the items that are most effective to reflect individual benefit. Furthermore,
the analysis seems to confirm the validity of such a reduction from similar
findings in the literature that were done on different datasets.

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Published
2020-05-01
How to Cite
Piechowiak, T., & Zapala, D. (2020). Using BEAR data to obtain reduced versions of the SSQ-12 and IOI-HA-7 questionnaires. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research, 7, 237-264. Retrieved from https://proceedings.isaar.eu/index.php/isaarproc/article/view/2019-29
Section
2019/4. Novel directions in hearing-instrument technology