Processing of fundamental frequency changes, emotional prosody and lexical tones by pediatric CI recipients

  • Monita Chatterjee Auditory Prostheses & Perception Laboratory, Center for Hearing Research, Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE, USA
  • Mickael L. D. Deroche Center for Research on Brain, Language and Music, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
  • Shu-Chen Peng Center for Devices and Radiological Health, United States Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD, USA
  • Hui-Ping Lu Chi-Mei Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology, Tainan, Taiwan
  • Nelson Lu Center for Devices and Radiological Health, United States Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD, USA
  • Yung-Song Lin Chi-Mei Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology, Tainan, Taiwan; Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
  • Charles J. Limb Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA

Abstract

As cochlear implants (CIs) do not provide adequate representation of the harmonic structure of complex sounds, the perception of the voice fundamental frequency (F0) is severely limited in CI users. As F0 plays an important role in speech prosody and in lexical tones, this deficit has a negative impact on communication.  Here we focus on the pediatric CI population, most of whom were prelingually deaf and were implanted before three years of age, within the most adaptive period of the brain’s development. Our results suggest that, relative to their normally-hearing peers, school-age children with CIs have significant deficits in their sensitivity to both static and dynamic F0-changes. In addition, children with CIs also have deficits in their identification of emotional prosody and in lexical-tone recognition.

References

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Published
2018-01-09
How to Cite
CHATTERJEE, Monita et al. Processing of fundamental frequency changes, emotional prosody and lexical tones by pediatric CI recipients. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research, [S.l.], v. 6, p. 117-125, jan. 2018. Available at: <https://proceedings.isaar.eu/index.php/isaarproc/article/view/2017-14>. Date accessed: 23 jan. 2018.
Section
2017/3. Adaptive and learning processes with hearing devices