Individual factors in speech recognition with binaural multi-microphone noise reduction: Measurement and prediction

  • Tobias Neher Medizinische Physik, Oldenburg University, Oldenburg, Germany Cluster of Excellence Hearing4all, Oldenburg, Germany
  • Jacob Aderhold Medizinische Physik, Oldenburg University, Oldenburg, Germany Cluster of Excellence Hearing4all, Oldenburg, Germany
  • Daniel Marquardt Signal Processing Group, Oldenburg University, Oldenburg, Germany Cluster of Excellence Hearing4all, Oldenburg, Germany
  • Thomas Brand Medizinische Physik, Oldenburg University, Oldenburg, Germany Cluster of Excellence Hearing4all, Oldenburg, Germany

Abstract

Multi-microphone noise reduction algorithms give typically rise to large signal-to-noise ratio improvements, but they can also severely distort binaural information and thus compromise spatial hearing abilities. To address this problem Klasen et al. (2007) proposed an extension of the binaural multi-channel Wiener filter (MWF), which suppresses only part of the noise and, in this way, preserves some binaural information (MWF-N). The current study had three aims: (1) to assess aided speech recognition with MWF(-N) for a group of elderly hearing-impaired listeners, (2) to explore the impact of individual factors on their performance, and (3) to test if outcome can be predicted using a binaural speech intelligibility model. Sixteen hearing aid users took part in the study. Speech recognition was assessed using headphone simulations of a spatially complex speech-in-noise scenario. Individual factors were assessed using audiometric, psychoacoustic (binaural), and cognitive measures. Analyses showed clear benefits from both MWF and MWF-N and also suggested sensory and binaural influences on speech recognition. Model predictions were reasonably accurate for MWF but not MWF-N, suggesting a need for some model refinement concerning supra-threshold processing.

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Published
2015-12-15
How to Cite
NEHER, Tobias et al. Individual factors in speech recognition with binaural multi-microphone noise reduction: Measurement and prediction. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research, [S.l.], v. 5, p. 237-244, dec. 2015. Available at: <https://proceedings.isaar.eu/index.php/isaarproc/article/view/2015-27>. Date accessed: 22 oct. 2017.
Section
2015/4. Compensation strategies for hearing rehabilitation with hearing aids