Are temporary threshold shifts reflected in the auditory brainstem response?

  • Lou-Ann Christensen Andersen Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark Department of Audiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark
  • Ture Andersen Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
  • Ellen Raben Pedersen The Maersk Mc-Kinney Moller Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
  • Jesper Hvass Schmidt Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark Department of Audiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark

Abstract

Background: Temporary hearing loss in connection with excessive exposure to sound is described as temporary threshold shift (TTS). The auditory cortex has neural pathways, which directly affect the medial olivocochlear system (MOCS) via the descending efferent auditory system. One of the functions of MOCS may be to protect the inner ear from noise exposure. Objective: To investigate the influence of a TTS measured with auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) using noise, familiar, and unfamiliar music as auditory exposure stimulus, respectively. Method: Normal-hearing subjects were exposed to the three different sound stimuli in randomized order on separate days. Each stimulus was 10 minutes long and the average sound pressure level was 100 dB. ABRs (4-kHz tone burst) were measured pre-exposure and also immediately after the sound exposure. Results: Preliminary results show a tendency towards an increase in the ABR amplitude for Jewit I and a decrease in the ABR amplitude for Jewit V for the left ear after sound exposure. Jewit I represents action potentials in the spiral ganglion neuron, and Jewit V represents action potentials further up the brainstem.

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Published
2015-12-15
How to Cite
ANDERSEN, Lou-Ann Christensen et al. Are temporary threshold shifts reflected in the auditory brainstem response?. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research, [S.l.], v. 5, p. 109-116, dec. 2015. Available at: <https://proceedings.isaar.eu/index.php/isaarproc/article/view/2015-13>. Date accessed: 20 nov. 2017.
Section
2015/2. Hidden hearing loss: Neural degeneration in "normal" hearing