Relations between auditory brainstem response and threshold metrics in normal and impaired hearing listeners

  • Sarah Verhulst Medizinische Physik and Cluster of Excellence “Hearing4all”, Dept. of Medical Physics and Acoustics, Oldenburg University, Oldenburg, Germany
  • Anoop Jagadeesh Medizinische Physik and Cluster of Excellence “Hearing4all”, Dept. of Medical Physics and Acoustics, Oldenburg University, Oldenburg, Germany
  • Manfred Mauermann Medizinische Physik and Cluster of Excellence “Hearing4all”, Dept. of Medical Physics and Acoustics, Oldenburg University, Oldenburg, Germany
  • Frauke Ernst Medizinische Physik and Cluster of Excellence “Hearing4all”, Dept. of Medical Physics and Acoustics, Oldenburg University, Oldenburg, Germany

Abstract

Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) offer a potential tool to diagnose auditory-nerve deficits in listeners with normal hearing thresholds as abnormalities in the amplitude of this population response may result from a loss in the number of auditory-nerve fibers contributing to this response. However, little is known about how cochlear gain loss interacts with auditory-nerve deficits to impact ABRs. We measured level-dependent changes in click-ABR wave-I and V in listeners with normal and elevated thresholds to study which measures are dominated by cochlear gain loss. ABR wave-V latency-vs-intensity functions correlated well to the distortion-product otoacoustic emission threshold and this relation was also observed for the slope of supra-threshold ABR wave-I level growth in listeners with thresholds above 20 dB SPL. ABR wave-I and wave-V growth were not related to each other, demanding caution when using ABR wave-V growth or level as a direct measure for auditory-nerve deficits.

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Published
2015-12-15
How to Cite
VERHULST, Sarah et al. Relations between auditory brainstem response and threshold metrics in normal and impaired hearing listeners. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research, [S.l.], v. 5, p. 35-42, dec. 2015. Available at: <https://proceedings.isaar.eu/index.php/isaarproc/article/view/2015-04>. Date accessed: 20 nov. 2017.
Section
2015/1. Characterizing individual differences in hearing loss