Applying physiologically-motivated models of auditory processing to automatic speech recognition

Authors

  • Richard M. Stern Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Language Technologies Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 USA

Abstract

For many years the human auditory system has been an inspiration for devel- opers of automatic speech recognition systems because of its ability to inter- pret speech accurately in a wide variety of difficult acoustical environments. This paper discusses the application of physiologically-motivated approaches to signal processing that facilitate robust automatic speech recognition in en- vironments with additive noise and reverberation. We review selected aspects of auditory processing that are believed to be especially relevant to speech perception, “classic” auditory models of the 1980s, the application of con- temporary auditory-based signal processing approaches to practical automatic speech recognition systems, and the impact of these models on speech recog- nition accuracy in degraded acoustical environments.

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Additional Files

Published

2011-12-15

How to Cite

Stern, R. M. (2011). Applying physiologically-motivated models of auditory processing to automatic speech recognition. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research, 3, 283–294. Retrieved from http://proceedings.isaar.eu/index.php/isaarproc/article/view/2011-33

Issue

Section

2011/3. Models of speech processing and perception